The Rail System

Rail System
The Main Western Railway in the rural context (Photograph taken from Huntley Road)

Location Main Western Railway, running North and South through the Local Government Area, and the Orange Broken Hill Railway, running West from Orange.

Statement of Significance

The railway line is examined here as a “linear landscape”. The railway line is a feature of the landscape in both urban and rural areas and forms a significant part of the scenery and experience of the district. Railway crossings are a common feature of both the rural and urban landscape.

Rail System2
The Wellington Line in the urban context

Historically, the arrival of the railway line marked a significant point in the development of Orange and the surrounding district. In 1877 the line between Bathurst and Orange was opened, linking Orange to Sydney via the Blue Mountains. People could travel easily to Bathurst and Sydney, farmers such as the Chinese market gardeners, were able to quickly transport their crops to the Sydney market and communications improved dramatically. The line was extended on to Wellington in 1880. The line to Forbes and on to Broken Hill was opened in 1893.

The continued encounter with the railway line, the effect of the railway on the development of Orange and the heritage value of various railway structures combine to make the railway line a significant feature of the Orange landscape.

Objects and Elements: The Rail System

Urban Level crossings

Rail SystemLevel crossings, such as at March Street (pictured), are a common feature of the townscape.

Rural Level crossings

Rail System2Level crossings, such as at Spring Hill (pictured), are a common feature of the rural landscape in the Orange Local Government Area.

Orange Railway Yards and Station: Station Building

Rail System3The station was opened in 1877 by NSW Premier, Sir Henry Parkes. The NSW Heritage Register lists the station group as significant for retaining “much of the early period of development including rare combined residence/station building”. The Railway Station is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000.

 

Rail System4Orange Railway Yards and Station: Wrought Iron Footbridge

The footbridge was built around 1910. The NSW Heritage Register states that the footbridge is a “rare surviving structure reflecting a style of construction from Whitton’s similar river bridges and pedestrian bridges”. The Pedestrian Bridge is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000.

Rail System5Orange East Fork Orange

East Fork is the point at which the Orange Broken Hill Line splits from the Main Western Line. The East Fork was identified through the community consultation process as a significant feature of the townscape.

Orange East Fork: Water Tank

Rail System6The water was used to refill the steam trains before the introduction of diesel locomotives in 1967.

Orange East Fork: Turntable

Rail System7The turntable was built in 1938, along with locomotive sheds and coal elevators. The sheds and elevators have since been largely dismantled.

Orange Broken Hill Line: Peisley Street Overpass

Rail System8A vehicular and pedestrian bridge crossing the Orange Broken Hill Line just to the West of the Orange East Fork.

Orange Broken Hill Line: Cutting, Racecourse Road

Rail System9The community consultation process identified the cutting as a significant feature of the landscape around the railway line. The exposed bedrock forms a visual link to the nearby Quarry on Racecourse Road.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: