Significant Trees: Cook Park

Deodar CedarLocation Cook Park. Summer Street, between Clinton and Sampson Streets, part of the Precinct of Central Orange.

Tree Species Deodar Cedar (Cedrus deodara) Physical Description Fine examples of mature exotic species. The four Deodar Cedars were planted in the early days of Cook Park and are over 120 years old. These trees form an impressive canopy.

Statement of Significance The Deodar Cedar is a Western Himalayan species and is typical of late nineteenth century park design. The outstanding mature plantings are a key component of the heritage listing for Cook Park. Associated Heritage Listing: Cook Park is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000. Associated document: Orange City Council, Cook Park Draft Plan of Management, compiled by Lyn Gough, Cook Park Supervisor. McCrone, Mark D. Landscape Architect, July 2003, “Cook and Robertson Parks: Orange Tree Assessment”.


Elm avenu Cook ParkLocation Cook Park. Summer Street, between Clinton and Sampson Streets, part of the Precinct of Central Orange.

Tree Species Elm (Ulmus campestris syn. procera)

Physical Description Mature avenue planting borders an axial path which is a typical characterisation of Cook Park. The approximately 60 year old avenue of Elm Trees provides summer shade and striking gold colour foliage in autumn.

Statement of Significance The avenue of elms define one of the key axial paths of Cook Park. The elms are believed to have been planted in the 1940’s. The avenue of Elms has significance for its aesthetic appeal. The avenue also has significance as the use of Elms in Australian planting schemes is not typical.

Associated Heritage Listing: Cook Park is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000.

Associated document: Orange City Council, Cook Park Draft Plan of Management, compiled by Lyn Gough, Cook Park Supervisor.

McCrone, Mark D. Landscape Architect, July 2003, “Cook and Robertson Parks: Orange Tree Assessment”.


 

Bunya Pine cookparkLocation Cook Park. Summer Street, between Clinton and Sampson Streets, part of the Precinct of Central Orange.

Tree Species Bunya Pine (Araucaria bidwillii)

Physical Description Mature specimen tree showing a medium domed form due to it’s maturity. Tree is in healthy condition with no visible signs of pruning or scarring.

Statement of Significance The tree has historical significance as it was believed to be part of the early planting program of the 1890’s, when the Bunya Pine was a typical inclusion in park planting schemes. In the context of Cook Park it should be seen as a specimen tree as it is not endemic to the Orange area.

Associated Heritage Listing: Cook Park is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000. Associated document: Orange City Council, Cook Park Draft Plan of Management, compiled by Lyn Gough, Cook Park Supervisor.

McCrone, Mark D. Landscape Architect, July 2003, “Cook and Robertson Parks: Orange Tree Assessment”.


Big Tree cook parkLocation Cook Park. Summer Street, between Clinton and Sampson Streets, part of the Precinct of Central Orange.

Tree Species ‘Big Tree’ (Sequoiadendron giganteum)

Physical Description Striking dark green foliage with evidence of branch and foliage die back. Tree shows characteristic of thick, tall trunk and weeping branches.

Statement of Significance This tree is one of the earliest planted in Cook Park and is over 120

Big Tree cook park1

years old. The tree is at the junction of a primary and secondary axial path and forms a key visual component of the layout.

Associated Heritage Listing: Cook Park is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000.

Associated document: Orange City Council, Cook Park Draft Plan of Management, compiled by Lyn Gough, Cook Park Supervisor.

McCrone, Mark D. Landscape Architect, July 2003, “Cook and Robertson Parks: Orange Tree Assessment”.


 

Sour Gum Cook ParkLocation Cook Park. Summer Street, between Clinton and Sampson Streets, part of Precinct of Central Orange.

Tree Species Sour Gum (Nyssa sylvatica)

Physical Description Attractive look in Autumn when carpet of leaves are on ground. Although it still only young, it is an excellent specimen for Orange. The tree has an open canopy allowing filtered light to penetrate.

Statement of Significance The Sour Gum is a Chinese species and planted here as a specimen planting. The tree is uncommon in the area. The Sour gum has an aesthetic significance for its seasonal colour.

Associated Heritage Listing: Cook Park is a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000.

Associated document: Orange City Council, Cook Park Draft Plan of Management, compiled by Lyn Gough, Cook Park Supervisor.

McCrone, Mark D. Landscape Architect, July 2003, “Cook and Robertson Parks: Orange Tree Assessment”.

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