Place: East Orange

Cottages of the East Orange on March Street, Bowen

Location Area bounded by William Street, Dalton Street, Nile Street, Icely Road and Bathurst Road, within the suburb of Bowen.

Statement of Significance

The streetscape of McLachlan Street is characterised by mature Plane trees (Platanus sp.) and wide roads
The streetscape of McLachlan Street is characterised by mature Plane trees (Platanus sp.) and wide roads

The 1986 Hughes Trueman and Ludlow Heritage Study identified the focus of Heritage interest within East Orange as the area generally bounded by William Street, Byng Street, Summer Street, Spring Street, Icely Road and Bathurst Road. Orange City Council essentially uses this boundary in their identification of the Conservation Area of East Orange. For the purposes of this study the area identified as East Orange has been extended slightly.

East Orange is divided from the central parts of Orange by the railway line and for twenty-four of Orange’s formative years was a separate municipality. East Orange was proclaimed a Municipality in 1888 and then amalgamated with the Municipality of Orange in 1912.

Orange City Council’s Development Control Plan notes that East Orange’s diverse mix of brick, timber and iron clad buildings in late Victorian, Edwardian and Bungalow style is in contrast to the consistency of the period brick homes of the central parts of Orange. This gives East Orange a distinctive streetscape character and provides a significant counterpoint to the character of Central Orange.


 

Objects and Elements: East Orange

Bowen TerraceBowen Terrace

3-25 Bathurst Road Designed by John Hale, who was also responsible for the designs of Croagh Patrick and Wolaroi, and built in 1876 for Henry Thomas Bowen. Bowen was a tanner, who lived nearby in Glenroi House and the terrace was built as housing for his workers. Bowen Terrace is registered on the NSW State Heritage Register, which states that its significance lies in the rarity of a terrace block outside of a major metropolitan area. Bowen Terrace is also a Schedule 8 Heritage Item of State Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000. The grand Victorian character of Bowen Terrace, with its recently restored original colour scheme, forms a distinctive entry point to the town centre.

Five WaysThe Five Ways

The Five Ways defines the point of departure from the Eastern part of Orange and the arrival into Central Orange. Whilst developments from the mid-twentieth century onwards have sometimes been unsympathetic to the heritage value of East and Central Orange, the space nonetheless physically defines the entry/departure point for the CBD of Orange. The Five Ways was identified as having significance through the community consultation process.

Mackie’s Store CornerMackie’s Store

Corner of Byng and McLachlan Streets Orange City Council’s DCP notes that Mackie’s Store is a notable example of the corner shops that are characteristic of East Orange. Mackie’s Corner Store was identified as having significance by the community.

Band HallBand Hall

William Street, Bowen The Band Hall was built in 1888 as the East Orange Council building. The Band Hall is Schedule 8 Heritage Item of Local Significance in the Orange Local Environment Plan 2000 and its windowless façade forms a distinctive aspect of the streetscape. The Band Hall was identified as a significant feature of the Orange townscape through the community consultation process.

Woollen MillsWoollen Mills

The Woollen Mills have formed a significant part of the townscape of East Orange since they began in 1925 as Amalgamated Textiles and after WWII as Macquarie Worsteds. The mill closed in 1989 and now houses a mix of commercial businesses. A fire destroyed parts of the building, but the remainder was renovated and the mills continue to form a part of the townscape of East Orange.

Colvin ParkColvin Park

The park was developed in 1926 on what is believed to be the site of an early brewery and named after the then Mayor, Dr. Colvin. The park is characterised by a number of educational interpretive garden beds planted amongst mature exotic trees.

 

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